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Amelia V. Gallucci-Cirio Library 



GIFT FROM 



JOHN G. THOMPSON 



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PRINCIPAL OF 
FITCHBURG NORMAL SCHOOL 
1894 - 1920 

* FITCHBURG STATE 

t UNIVERSITY 






THE THOMPSON READERS 



13006 CtDO 



BY 

JOHN G. THOMPSON 

PRINCIPAL STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, FITCHBURG, MASS. 

AND 

INEZ BIGWOOD 

INSTRUCTOR IN PRIMARY LITERATURE, STATE NORMAL SCHOOL, C^ 

FITCHBURG, MASS. ^ 



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SILVER, BURDETT AND COMPANY 

BOSTON NEW YORK CHICAGO 



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RARY 



COPYRIGHT, 1917, BY 

SILVER. BURDETT AND COMPANY 



INTRODUCTION 

In learning to read, the child makes a simple begin- 
ning, acquiring gradually the visual signs of hundreds of 
words, the articulate sounds of which he already knows. 
Having gained some proficiency in this, he proceeds to 
more difficult, and at the same time, more interesting 
reading — more difficult owing to the appearance of new 
and unknown visual signs, and more interesting because 
of the association of both the old and the new in a way 
to express more complete and pleasing thought. 

Having read Book One in the Word from Word Series, 
the pupils, in command of over a thousand words, come 
with readiness and with keen anticipation to the reading 
of Book Two. This book is intended for the second half 
of the first year. The aim in this, as in every other book 
of the entire series, is to avoid sudden leaps from easy to 
difficult. So, while the stories involve new words and 
expressions, these have been introduced gradually, and 
those already made familiar through the reading of Book 

3 



One, are allowed to appear under new conditions. Thus, 
the pupils may read with comparative freedom and ease, 
and with great enjoyment. 

The stories chosen are unfamiliar and many of them 
are entirely new to school readers. They command the 
interest and arouse the imagination of the little folks. 
They reveal vital truths in a simple, childlike manner. 
"The Man Who Knew Everything" and "Helping the 
Goodman " are examples of this. What is the one ques- 
tion, asked by the child in the story, which the wise man 
cannot answer ? Even little children appreciate the truth 
in the wise man's reply. A common tendency in human 
nature is shown in " Helping the Goodman. " Children 
may not discern this truth unless it is pointed out to 
them, but no teacher will fail to do this if she perceives 
it herself. 

Similar mention might be made concerning the other 
stories in the book, a full explanation of each of which 
will be found in the Teacher's Manual. 



BOOK TWO 

There was a little boy 

named Jack. 
There was a little girl 

named Jill. 
They went up a hill 

to get a pail 

of water. 
They both fell down. 
Do you remember them ? 
There was an old lady jj 

who lived under 

a hill. 
Do you remember her ? 

5 








There was a red robin 
lived up in a tree. 
Do you remember him ? 
There was a town 
named Dover. 
There was a little boy 
named Bob. 
There was a little boy named Bill. 
They went out to ride together. 
Do you remember them? 
There was a little boy named Karl. 
There was a little girl named Kate. 
They went out to meet their little 

brother. 
Then they went out to skate. 
Do you remember them? 

6 



There were two crows 

sat on a stone. 
There were five crows 

in the farmer's 

corn. 
Do you remember them ? 
There was an old 

woman who lived 

in a shoe. 
There was an old fox 

who lived in a den. 
Do you remember them? 
There was little Jack 

Horner who said, 

"What a big boy 

am I!" 





LITTLE BOY BLUE 



8 



There was Little Jack Light-Hair 
who said, " What a queer kind 
of pie ! w 

There was Little Boy Blue 
who tends the sheep. 

There was Little Tom T upper 
who was eating his supper. 

Do you remember them ? 

There were Pussy Cat and Puppy Log. 
and Little Boy and Pretty Girl, 
who had all been to London 
to see the queen. 

Do you remember them ? 

There were the fox and the crow, 
the wolf and the goat, 
the monkey and the cat, 

9 



the pet dog and the donkey, 

the lion and the mouse. 
There were the kite and the frog, 

the mouse and the birds, 

the beasts and the bat. 
Do you remember them? 
There was Little Johnny Green 

who drowned poor Pussy Oat. 
There was Little Johnny Stout 

who pulled her out. 
There were Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, 

Cock-lock, Duck-luck, Goose-loose, 

Turkey-lurkey, and Fox-lox. 
They were going to tell the king 

that the sky had fallen. 

Do you remember them ? 

10 



There were four and 
twenty blackbirds 
baked in a pie. 

There was the clock 
that struck one. 

There was the man 
in the moon who 
came down too soon. 

Do you remember them ? 

There were four and 
twenty black crows 
early in the morn. 

There was the farmer's 

scarecrow standing 

in the corn. 

Do you remember them? 

11 






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Jack and Joe, 
To town they go 
To sell some pails 
of butter : 




Jack makes the sale of every pail, 
For Joe can only stutter. 



He and she went off to sea, 

For a trip upon the water; 

Sick was he, and sicker she ; 

They'll stay on land hereafter. 

12 



There was an old woman 
Who lived in a cave; 
She had so many children, 
She never could save. 



There was an old woman 
Who lived in the woods ; 
She had so many children, 
They never had hoods. 

There was an old woman 
Who lived in a town ; 
She had so many children, 
She never sat down. 
Do you wonder this woman 
Sometimes would frown? 

13 




There was 

an old lady 
Lived under a tree; 
And if she's 

not gone, 
By the tree 

she will be. 



Lem and Lee 

Climbed up a tree 

To get some nuts 

for Sunday. 

Lem fell down, 

Lee broke his crown 
They were both in 

bed on Monday. 

14 




Jack Sprat could eat no fat. 
His wife could eat no lean. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 
Cock Robin was killed 

by a sparrow. 
The little fly 

saw him die. 
The kite carried him 

to the grave. 
The thrush sang a song. 
The dove mourned for him. 
The bull rang the bell. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 
Old Mother Hubbard went 

to the cupboard. 
Old Mother Cantry went to the pantry. 

15 




Old Mother Cable 

went to the stable. 
Old Mother Ricenest 

went to the ice chest. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 
Little Miss Muffet 

sat on a tuffet. 
Little Miss Cassock 

sat on a hassock. 
Little Miss Cammock 

sat in a hammock. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 




16 




Simple Simon met a pieman. 
Little Bo-Peep lost her sheep. 
Little Tom Tucker sang 

for his supper. 
Sleepy-Head wanted to go to bed. 
Slow wanted to wait a while. 
Greedy Nan wanted to eat. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 

17 



Jack Sprat had a pig. 

Every child has five little pigs. 

You have five little pigs 

on each little hand. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 
Three wise men went to sea 

in a bowl. 
The black sheep had three bags 

of wool. 
The cat played on the fiddle. 
The little dog laughed. 
The cow jumped over the moon. 
Did you ever hear of them ? 
Read on, little boy, little girl, 

and you shall hear of all 

of them and many more. 

18 



Old Mother Hubbard 
Went to the cupboard 
To get her poor dog 

a bone; 
But when she got there, 

the cupboard was bare, f 
And so the poor dog 

had none. 




Old Mother Cable 
Went to the stable 
To see her poor horse 

was fed ; 
But when she got there 
The grain bin was bare, 
And the poor horse was dead. 

19 



Old Mother Cable 

Went to the stable 

To give her poor cow some hay; 

But when she got there, 

The stable was bare. 

And so the poor cow ran away. 

Old Mother Ricenest 

Went to the ice chest 

To get her poor cat some meat; 

But when she got there, 

The ice chest was bare, 

And so the poor cat didn't eat. 




20 



Little Miss Muffet 

Sat on a tuffet, 

Eating of curds and whey; 

There came a black spider 

And sat down beside her. 

Which frightened Miss Muffet away. 

Little Miss Cassock 

Sat on a hassock, 

Eating plum porridge one day; 

There came a big collie 

And sniffed at her dolly, 

Which frightened Miss Cassock away. 




21 




THE LION ROAKED THAT HE WAS THE MOST BEAUTIFUL 



22 



THE MOST BEAUTIFUL ANIMAL 

The animals once had a quarrel 

as to which one was 

the most beautiful of them all. 
The elephant thought he was 

the most beautiful. 
The camel said that he was 

the most beautiful animal. 
The donkey thought he was 

the most beautiful of them all. 
The lion roared that he was 

the most beautiful. 
The tiger said that no other animal 

was so beautiful as he was. 

23 



The horse thought he was 

the most beautiful of all. 
The cow said that she was 

the most beautiful. 
The goat thought that he 

was more beautiful than any 

other animal. 
The sheep said that no animal 

was so beautiful as the sheep. 
The rabbit said the small animals 

were much more beautiful 

than the big animals, and that he 

was the most beautiful 

of the small animals. 
The dog thought he was 

the most beautiful of all animals. 

24 




THE FOX IS VERY WISE AND CUNNING 



25 



The cat was sure that she was 

the most beautiful of all. 
They could not agree as to which was 

the most beautiful animal. 
So they agreed to let some one else 

decide it. 
"Let the fox decide it," 

roared the lion, "for he 
is very wise and very cunning." 
No, no/' cried the tiger. 
The fox is very cunning. 
He would decide 
for the king, the lion. 
Let no animal decide it. 
Let the owl decide it. 
The owl is the bird of wisdom." 

26 




a 



"No, no," cried the elephant. 

"The owl cannot see us 

in the daytime, and can 

only half see us in the dark 

at night. 
Let no animal decide it. 
Let no bird decide it. 
Let man decide which of us 

is most beautiful. 
He can see us, and he knows 

more than the owl or the fox." 
So they agreed to let man decide 

which animal was the most 

beautiful. 
He was willing, and all the animals 

came before him. 

27 




..infni 

isMiult "'"- 



ALL THE ANIMALS (JAME BEFORE HIM 



28 



One after another, the animals 

asked man to look and see 

how beautiful they were. 
"See my beautiful eyes and my 

beautiful mane," roared the lion. 
"See my beautiful stripes and my 

glossy coat/' said the tiger. 
"See how big I am and what 

a fine trunk I have," 

cried the elephant. 
" See my beautiful humps 

and my long neck," said the camel. 
"Look at my long ears and rough 

coat/' brayed the donkey. 
"Look at my fine horns/' mooed 

the cow. 

29 



And all the animals, one after another, 
asked man to look and see 
how beautiful they were. 

And man looked at them, one by one, 
and then said, 

" The horse is the most beautiful 
of all the animals, for he is 
of the most help to man. 

Handsome is as handsome does." 

13ut none of the animals, 

except the horse, was satisfied. 

The others all thought that man 
had not decided fairly. 




30 




SIMPLE SIMON 

Simple Simon 

Met a pieman 

Going to the fair; 

Said Simple Simon 

To the pieman, 

a Let me taste your ware." 

Said the pieman 
To Simple Simon, 
"Show me first your 

penny." 
Said Simple Simon 
To the pieman, 
" Indeed, I have not any." 

31 







He went to catch a little bird 




And thought he could not fail, 
Because he had 
a little salt 
To put upon his tail. 

He went to shoot 
a wild duck, 
But the wild duck flew away; 
Said Simon, " I can't hit him, 
Because he will not stay." 

Simple Simon went 

a-hunting 
For to catch a hare ; 
He hunted through the street, 
But couldn't find one there. 

32 




Simple Simon went a-flshing 
For to catch a whale; 
All the water he had got 
Was in his mother's pail. 

Simple Simon went to look 

If plums grew on a thistle ; 

He pricked his fingers till they bled, 

Which made poor Simon whistle. 

He went for water in a sieve, 
But soon the sieve was dry; 
And now poor Simple Simon 
Bids you all good-bye. 




«//^,; l '''('k/' lll W> l l ll <4iiWWi",li 

'M||H*E'/||* l.hMu alt')?*' W 




33 




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NED SOON CAME BACK WITH A LADDER 



34 



SOUR GRAPES AGAIN 

One day Nat and Ned were walking 

in the woods. 
They found some grapes 

growing high up in a tree. 
Nat said, "I am going to get some." 
He tried to climb the tree 

but he could not climb it. 
He tried again and again 

but he could not climb the tree. 
So at last he said, 

"I don't want any grapes. 

They are sour anyhow." 
But Ned said, "I want some of them. 

Help me climb the tree." 

35 



Ned tried and tried, but he could not 
climb the tree. 



u 



Well," he said, "I am going to have 

some of those grapes." 
He went away and soon came back 

with a ladder. 
He was soon up in the tree 

and eating the grapes. 
"Drop some down to me," said Nat. 
Ned dropped him some. 
" How sweet they are," cried Nat. 
Yes," said Ned, "I like them 

very much." 



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36 



This little pig 

went to market. 



This little pig 

stayed at home. 

This little pig had 
bread and butter. 



This little pig 
had none. 

This little pig cried, 

u Wee, wee ! I can't 
find my way home." 

37 



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Let's go to the woods/ 5 
Said this little pig. 
"What to do there?" 
Asked this little pig. 
"To find mama/ 7 
Said this little pig. 
"What to do with her?" 
Said this little pig. 
"To kiss her, to kiss her/' 
Said this little pig. 




38 



This little pig 

Lives all alone. 

This little pig 

Lives with three others. 

This little pig 

Stays always at home. 

This little pig 

Lives with his brothers. 

And this littlest pig 

Says, " Wee, wee ! 

I am almost as big 

As the others." 




39 




WHO KILLED COCK ROBIN? 



40 



COCK ROBIN 

Who killed Cock Robin? 
"I," said the sparrow. 
"With my bow and arrow, 
I killed Cock Robin." 

This is the sparrow 
With his bow and arrow. 

Who saw him die ? 
" I," said the fly. 
"With my little eye, 
I saw him die." 



This is the fly 

Who saw Cock Robin die. 

41 



• 






Who'll carry him to the grave? 

"I," said the kite. 

" If it's not in the night, 

I'll carry him to the grave." 

This is the kite 
About to take flight. 

Who'll sing a song ? 
"I," said the thrush, 
As she sat on a bush. 





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I'll sing a song. 



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This is the thrush 
Singing songs from a bush. 

42 



Who'll be the chief 
mourner ? 

"I," said the dove, 

u For I mourn for my love. 

I'll be chief mourner." 

This is the dove 

Whom Cock Robin did love 

Who'll toll the bell? 
"I," said the bull, 
"Because I can pull." 
So, Cock Robin, 
farewell. 



This is the bull 



Who the rope 
did pull. 




43 



All the birds of the air 
Fell to sighing and sobbing 
When they heard the bell toll 
For poor Cock Robin. 

For he killed Cock Robin, 
The wicked sparrow; 
With his bow and arrow, 
He killed Cock Robin. 




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44 



THE MAN WHO KNEW EVERYTHING 

Once upon a time, there was a man 
who lived in a country 
far away and who thought 
that he knew everything. 

He had put everything one can know 
into great books. 

The king in another country 

heard of him and wanted to find out 
if this wise man did know 
everything. 

So the king called the wise men 
of his own country together 
and asked them if they thought 
that any one could know everything. 

45 




HE HAD PUT EVERYTHING ONE CAN KNOW INTO GREAT BOOKS 



46 



All the wise men said, 

" No, no one can know everything." 

The king told them of the wise man 
in a far-away country who said 
that he knew everything. 

The wise men had heard of him, 
but they were sure there were 
many things he did not know. 

"Let us send one of our wise men/' 
said one of them, 
"to this far-away country 
to ask some questions of this man 
who knows everything." 

"That is good/ 7 cried the king. 

" I will send the wisest one of you. 
Who is the wisest of you all ? " 

47 



All but one of them cried out, 

" It is John, the abbot ! Send him ! 
He is the wisest of us all." 

But John, the abbot, said, 
"No, no, king! 

Do not send me. Send no wise man. 

Send a little child, 

for a little child can ask 
questions no man can answer." 




So they sent a little child 

to the far-away country 

to ask some questions 

of the wise man who said 

he knew everything. 
The very wise man said 

that he would answer 

the child's questions. 
Then the little child was brought 

before him. 
And the little child 

asked this wise man, 

"What is the earth ?" 
And the wise man said, 

" A great ball, cold on the outside 

and fire inside. " 

49 



All were surprised, for every one 

then thought the earth was flat 

and made of rock. 
Then the child asked, 

" What is the sun ? " 
The wise man answered, 

" A great ball of fire, 

a million times as big 

as the earth." 
Then the child asked, 

"What is the moon?" 
And the wise man answered, 

"A cold ball that shines 

in the light of the sun." 
"Who made the earth, the sun, and 

the moon?" asked the child. 

50 



The wise man answered, 

a God made them." 
" And what am I ? " asked the child. 
" You are the image of God," 

answered the wise man. 
" And what is God ? " asked the child. 
"I do not know/ 7 said the wise man. 

"No man knows 

and no man can know. 

I only know what men can know." 
The little child went back 

to his own country 

and told the king 

that the man was very wise, 

but that he did not know 

everything. 

51 




JACK SPRAT AND HIS WIFE 



52 



JACK SPRAT AND HIS WIFE 



Who knew Jack Sprat? 
"I," said Bo-Peep 
Who tended the sheep. 
"I knew Jack Sprat." 

This is Bo-Peep 

Who tended the sheep. 




Who saw him eat ? 
"I," said Jack Horner. 
a As I sat in the corner . 
I saw him eat." 

This is Jack Horner 
Who sat in the corner. 

53 




Who met his wife ? 




"I," said little Jill. 
"As I went up the hill, 
I met his wife." 



This is little Jill, 
Who went up the hill. 




Who brought the platter? 



a t w 



I," said Tom Tupper. 
"I brought it for supper, 
I brought the platter." 

This is Tom Tupper, 
Always thinking of supper. 

54 



Who got the meat? 
"I," said Boy Blue. 
"I made them a stew; 
I got the meat." 

This is Boy Blue 

Who made them a stew. 




Where did they eat it? 
In the dining room fine, 
On a table of pine, 
There they did eat it. 




55 



Who licked the platter? 
Jack Sprat and his wife, 
With no fork and no knife, 
They licked the platter. 

This is Jack Sprat and his wife 
Who lived such a life. 



Then learn, little girl, little boy, 
To use your fork and your knife, 
When you read the sad story 
Of Jack Sprat and his wife. 




56 



KINDNESS AND PRAISE 



Do you remember 

the fox and the 

crow? 
The fox said the crow 

was pretty. 
He asked her to sing. 
The crow dropped the cheese 

she had in her bill. 
The fox ran away with it 

and ate it. 
Everybody likes praise 

and will do 



a great deal 
for praise. 




r-V.<Vis2 



..' • r P u u 



57 



Do you remember 

the north wind and the sun? 
The north wind was strength. 
The sun was kindness. 
Kindness made the man 

take off his cloak, 

when strength could not do it. 

Tom had some work to do. 
He wanted to play, 

but he had to do the work. 
He was whitewashing a fence. 
Soon his playmates came 

to watch him at work. 
They made fun of him. 
Tom worked on as if he liked it. 

58 




1 1 LI **■ 

SaMi 

Pretty soon one of his playmates 

wanted to try it. 
He thought that he could 

whitewash as well as Tom. 
Tom let him do a little. 
He did it very well. 
Tom praised his work. 
He told him how well he did it. 

59 



Then another boy wanted to try it. 
He thought he could whitewash 

better than Tom. 
Tom let him do a little 

and praised his work. 
Then another boy thought 

he could do it even better. 
Tom let him try it and praised his work. 
One boy after another tried it, 

till the fence was all whitewashed. 
Then Tom went off to play with the boys. 
Kindness and praise will do 

a great deal. 

Do you remember the monkey 
and the cat? 

60 



Do you remember 

how the monkey got the cat 

to pull the hot chestnuts 

out of the fire for him ? 
Tom got his playmates to do his work 

for him. 
Don't you think Tom 

was a little like the monkey ? 
He got his playmates 

to do something for him 

that he did not like to do himself. 
He got them to pull his chestnuts 

out of the fire. 




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61 



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Jack Sprat 

Could eat no fat, 

His wife could eat no lean; 

So between them both. 

They cleaned the cloth 

And licked the platter clean. 



Jack Nutch 

Did speak Low Dutch, 

His wife did speak Malay; 

So for the two, 

There was nothing to do, 

But to talk to themselves all day. 

62 



There was an old horse 
Going to the mill; 
When he went on, 
He didn't stand still. 




There was an old man, 
Tall and thin; 
When he went out, 
He didn't go in. 




There was a bold laddie 
Came home to sup; 
When he sat down, 
He didn't stand up. 

63 





There was a big boy 
Lived in our town ; 
When he looked up, 
He didn't look down. 




There was an old man 
Getting thinner and 

thinner ; 
When he ate supper, 
He didn't eat dinner. 




There were some apples 
Sold at a fair; 
When you bought two, 
You got a pair. 

64 




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HELPING THE GOODMAN 

A farmer had been to town 

to sell some butter. I 

He was nearly home 

when his cart broke clown. 
He could not leave the horses, 

so he called for help. 
He was so near home, he thought 

some one would hear him. 
So he yelled at the top of his voice. 
And, sure enough, some one 

did hear him. 

65 



Chicken-licken heard him. 
She ran to Hen-pen and cried, 

"0 dear! dear! 

The goodman is calling for help. 

His cart has broken down." 
a Yes, yes," cried Hen-pen. 

"Let us tell Cock-lock." 
And Chicken-licken and Hen-pen 

ran to Cock-lock and cried, 

" dear ! dear ! 

The goodman is calling for help. 

His cart has broken down." 
" Yes, yes," cried Cock-lock. 

"Let us tell Duck-luck." 
And Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, 

and Cock-lock ran to Duck-luck. 

66 



They cried, 

a dear! 

The goodman 

is calling 

for help. 

His cart has 

broken down." 
"Yes, yes," cried 

Duck-luck. 
" Let us go and tell 

Drake-lake." 
And Chicken-licken, 

Hen-pen, 

Cock-lock, 

and Duck-luck 



ran as fast 










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&*; : 



h, 



^ 







67 



as they could to find Drake-lake. 
They found him in the pond 

and cried out to him, 

"Come and help the goodman. 

His cart has broken down." 
" I will ! I will ! w cried Drake-lake. 

"I will be glad to help him. 

Let us tell Goose-loose." 
Drake-lake came up from the pond. 
And Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 

Duck-luck, and Drake-lake ran off 

to find Goose-loose. 
They found her at the other side 

of the pond. 
" Come," they cried, 

"the goodman needs help. 

68 



His cart has broken down." 
"Yes, I will come/' said Goose-loose, 

"but I must tell Gander-lander." 
And Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, 

Cock-lock, Duck-luck, 

Drake-lake, and Goose-loose 

ran off as fast as they could 

to find Gander-lander. 
He was eating grass at the edge 

of the pond. 
"Come," they cried, 

"the goodman is calling for help. 

His cart is broken down." 
"Yes, yes," cried Gander-lander. 
I will come, but let us get 



a 



Hoggy-woggy." 

69 




So Chicken-licken, 

Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, 
Goose-loose, 
and Gander-lander 
ran off together 
to find Hoggy-woggy. 
They found him down in the barnyard. 
" Come ! come ! " they cried. 
"The goodman needs help. 
His cart has broken down. 
Come with us and help him." 
Yup, yup," grunted Hoggy-woggy. 
"I will help him, 
but we must get Willy-calf. 
Let us run and tell Willy-calf. " 

70 



u 



And Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 
Gander-lander, and Hoggy-woggy 
ran off to find Willy-calf. 

They found him in the stall. 

" Come on ! come on ! " they cried. 
"The goodman is calling for help. 
His cart has broken down." 

"Yes, yes," said Willy-calf. 
"I will help him, 
but let us get 
Dolly-cow." 

So Chicken-licken, 

Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, 
Goose-loose, Gander-lander, 

71 





Hoggy-woggy, and Willy-calf 
ran off to find Dolly-cow. 
They found her in the barn 

chewing her cud. 
" Come on ! come on ! 1 
they cried. 
"The goodman is 
calling for help. 
His cart has broken down." 
" Very well, very well," said Dolly-cow, 
"but let us get Nanny-goat, too." 
And Chieken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 
Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 
Willy-calf, and Dolly-cow 
ran off to find Nanny-goat. 

72 



They found her back of the barn, 
eating whatever she could find. 

"The goodman is calling for help/' 
they all cried. 

" His cart has broken down. 
Come with us and help him." 

"I will! I will!" 

cried Nanny-goat, 
" but I must first 
find Billy-goat." 

So Chicken-licken, 

Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, 
Goose-loose, Gander-lander, 
Hoggy-woggy, Willy-calf, 
Dolly-cow, and Nanny-goat 

73 




ran as fast 
as they could 
to find Billy-goat. 
They found him out 
in the field, 
butting the colt. 
" Stop that ! M they all cried. 

" Come with us ! come with us ! 

The goodman is calling for help. 

His cart has broken down." 




>» 



I'll stop/' cried Billy-goat, 

and he stopped butting the colt. 
" But let us get Brayer, the donkey." 
And Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 
Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 

74 




Willy-calf, Dolly-cow, Nanny-goat, 

and Billy-goat ran off 

to find Brayer, 

the donkey. 
They found him looking 

over the barnyard fence. 
"Come! come!" they all cried. 

" The goodman is calling for help. 

His cart has broken down 

a little way up the road." 
" HI come ! I'll come ! " cried Brayer, 

the donkey. 

" But let us get Kicker, the mule." 
So Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 

Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 

Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 

75 



Willy-calf, Dolly-cow, Nanny-goat, 
Billy-goat, and Brayer, the donkey, 

ran off together 
to find Kicker, 
the mule. 
At last they found him 

down in the meadow. 
" Hurry ! hurry ! " they cried. 
" Come with us. 

The goodman's cart is broken down, 
and he is calling for help." 
" Where is he?" asked Kicker, the mule. 
"He did not call for me. 
He does not want my help." 
" Come on ! come on ! " they all cried. 




" He wants all of us to help him. 

76 



11 




"All right," said Kicker, 
the mule, "I will go, 
but not unless Jerry, 
the horse, goes too." 

So Ohicken-licken, 

Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 
Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 
Willy-calf, Dolly-cow, Nanny-goat, 
Billy-goat, Brayer, the donkey, 
and Kicker, the mule, ran off 
to find Jerry, the horse. 

They found him 

at the upper end of the pasture, 
eating the sweet green grass. 

"The goodman is calling for help. 

77 



His cart has broken down 



a little way up the road. 
Come with us and help him," 
they all cried. 
u Very well, I will," said Jerry, 
the horse. 

"But let us get Tom, the hired man." 
And Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, 
Cock-lock, Duck-luck, 
Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 
Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 
Willy-calf, Dolly-cow, 
Nanny-goat, Billy-goat, 
Brayer, the donkey, 
Kicker, the mule, and Jerry, the horse, 




all ran off, 



78 



as fast as they could, 

to find Tom, the hired man. 
They found him at last. 
He was planting peas in the garden. 
" Hurry ! hurry ! w they all cried. 

"The cart has broken down 

a little way up the road." 
u All right ! all right ! " cried Tom, 

the hired man. 

"But let us first tell Fanny, 

the goodman's wife." 
So Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-loci 

Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 

Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 
I Willy-calf, Dolly-cow, 

Nanny-goat, Billy-goat, Brayer, 

79 



S 



the donkey , Kicker, the mule, 
Jerry, the horse, and Tom, 
the hired man, ran off 
to get Fanny, the farmer's wife. 
They found her in the kitchen, 

getting dinner. 
" Come ! come ! " they all cried. 

" The goodman 

is in trouble. 

He is calling for help. 

His cart has broken down, 
just a little way up the road." 
So Chicken-licken, Hen-pen, Cock-lock, 
Duck-luck, Drake-lake, Goose-loose, 
Gander-lander, Hoggy-woggy, 
Willy-calf, Dolly-cow, 

80 




Nanny-goat, Billy-goat, 
Brayer, the donkey, Kicker, 
the mule, Jerry, the horse, 
Tom, the hired man, and Fanny, 
the farmer's wife, all ran 
to help him. 

They found him 

a little way up the road. 

But they had been so long 
in coming to help him 
that he had mended the cart 
and was starting for home. 




81 



Leg over leg, 

As the dog went to Dover; 
When he came to a gate, 
Jump, he went over. 



The north wind doth blow 
And we shall have snow, 
And what will poor Robin 

do then? 
Poor thing ! 

He will fly to the barn 
To keep himself warm, 

And hide his head under 
his wing, 

Poor thing ! 

82 





"Let's go to bed," 

Says Sleepy-Head. 

" Let's wait awhile/' 

Says Slow. 

"Put on the pan/' 

Says Greedy Nan. 

"Let's eat before we go." 

83 





Little Tom Tupper 
Sings for his supper. 
What shall he eat? 
White bread and butter. 
How shall he cut it 
Without any knife ? 
How shall he marry 
Without any wife? 

Pit, pat, well-a-day! 
Little Robin flew away. 
Where can little Robin be ? 
But up in the apple tree ? 



Away, birds, away! 

Take a little, leave a little, 

And come again some day. 

84 



The cock doth crow 
To let you know, 
If you be wise, 
'Tis time to rise. 

Three men of Gotham 
Went to sea in a bowl ; 
If the bowl had been 

stronger, 
My story had been 

longer. 

Young lambs to sell! 
If I had as much money 
As I could tell, 
I never would cry, 
Young lambs to sell! 

85 




I ' ■ • A ( I 



i'. . 



1' ! i ', » 



s ' 

WL 




TOM WAS VERY UNHAPPY 



86 



GREEDY TOM 

A little boy was very greedy. 
The little boy's name was Tom. 
Tom wanted everything for himself. 
Tom wanted all the playthings. 
Tom wanted all the pretty clothes. 
He wanted all the good things to eat. 
Tom had no brothers and no sisters. 
His father was very rich. 
So Tom had nearly everything 

that he wanted. 
He never had everything he wanted. 
He always wanted something more. 
He did not always know 

what he wanted. 

87 






So he was very unhappy. 

Tom was not very strong and well 

He was a sickly little boy. 

He wanted so much and had so much 

that he could not keep well. 
Sometimes little children 

call a playmate Greedy Cat. 
Do you know why? 




You shall have an apple, 
You shall have a plum, 
You shall have a pudding, too, 
When daddy comes home. 

88 



Rain, rain, 
Go away ! 
Come again, 
Some other day; 
Little Johnny 
Wants to play. 




Little Bo-Peep 
Has lost her sheep, 
And can't tell 
Where to find them, 
Let them alone ! 
They'll come home, 
Bringing their tails 
Behind them. 




«v.' \\\\fT\ 

'..o.TT'/'.'j..^?"-" 



89 



Rain, rain, go to Spain, 
And never come back again. 






Jack Sprat's pig — ' 

He was not very little, 

He was not very big, 

He was not very lean, 

He was not very fat ; 

"He will do very 

well," 
Said little Jack Sprat. 




90 



THE PITFALL 



Once on a time, there was a man 

who lived far, far away in a wood. 
He had many, many goats and sheep, 

but he could not keep them, 

for Graylegs, the wolf, 

kept stealing them. 
So at last the man said, 

"I will make a trap 

and catch Graylegs, the wolf." 
And he set to work to dig a pitfall. 
He dug a great hole in the ground. 
He dug it deep enough 

so Graylegs could not get out. 

91 





Then he put a pole down 
in the middle of it. 

The top of the pole 
stuck out high 
above the ground. 

On the top of the pole, 
he put a big, 
round board. 

On the board he tied 
a little dog. 

He covered the pit 
with branches 
and put snow 
on top of them. 

No one could see 

where the pit was. 

92 



All you could see was a little dog 

tied to a board on the top 

of a pole. 
When night came, the little dog 

grew tired of sitting 

on the board 

and began to bark, "Bow-wow, 

bow-wow, 

bow-wow." 
He barked and kept 

barking at the moon. 
Just then Mr. Fox 

came along. 
He thought the little dog 

would make him a good supper. 
So he made a jump at him, 

93 




He did not reach him, but tumbled 
head over heels into the pit. 

The pit was so deep 

Mr. Fox could not get out. 

So he crawled off into one corner 
and kept still. 

A little while after, 

the little dog got so tired 
that he began to bark again, 
" Bow-wow, bow-wow, bow-wow." 

Just then Gray legs, the wolf, 
came along. 

He heard the little dog barking. 

Graylegs thought the little dog 

would make him a good supper. 

So he made a jump at him. 

94 



He did not reach him, 

| but tumbled head over heels 

into the pit. 
When he picked himself up, 

he saw the fox in one corner, 

so he crawled off into another 

and kept still. 
When it was nearly morning, 
; it began to snow 

and the wind began to blow. 
It grew so cold that the little dog 

was nearly frozen. 
So he began to bark again, 
| " Bow-wow, bow-wow, bow-wow." 
He barked and howled, 

and howled and barked. 

95 




Father Bear 
came along 
and said, 
"Here is a 
fine breakfast 
for me." 
He walked slowly to the pole 
and just before he got to it, 
down he went, head over heels, 
into the pit. 
He saw the fox in one corner 
and Graylegs, the wolf, 
in another. 
So he crawled over into another. 
Just as the sun rose, an old woman 
came walking by. 

96 



She carried a bag of meal 

on her back. 
She saw the little dog 

on the board. 
She heard him barking and howling 

with all his might. 
So she crawled up to the edge 

01 the pit and peeped into it. 
" So you are caught at last, Mr. Fox," 

she said, for she saw him first. 

" I am very glad of it, 

you old hen thief. 

I am very glad of it." 
Then she saw Graylegs, the wolf, 

and cried, "And you too, Graylegs ! 

How glad I am ! 

97 



Many a goat and sheep 
you have carried off 
and killed, and now 
it is your turn. 
How glad I am!" 

As she cried out, 

"How glad I am/' 
she stooped over 
so far that the bag 
of meal fell off 
her shoulder 
and dragged her 
into the pit 
heels over head. 



She was stunned by the fall, 

but at last she picked herself up. 

98 




She crawled over 

into the fourth corner 

and there they all sat — 

Mr. Fox in one corner; Graylegs, 

the wolf, in the second corner; 

Father Bear in the third; 

and the old woman in the fourth. 

As soon as it was daylight, 

the fox began to peep and to peer, 
and to twist and to turn about, 
for he thought he might as well 
try to get out. 

Then the old woman began to scold him. 
"Can't you keep still," she cried, 
"you old hen thief? 
Are you afraid? 

99 



-d 



See how still 
Father Bear 
sits in his corner. 
He is no coward." 

The old woman 
j\j thought it well 

to make friends 
with Father Bear, 
for if they should 
get to fighting, 
he would be 
the strongest. 

But just then, 

up came the man 
who made the pitfall. 

He looked in at them. 

100 



Then he drew the old woman out. 
After that he killed Mr. Fox, 

old Graylegs, the wolf, 

and Father Bear who sat so still 

in his corner. 
After that night, he did not lose 

so many of his sheep and goats. 





Ri '1)1 



m 






Little boy, little boy, 

Where are you going? 

I will go with you, if I may. 

x ^ I am going to the meadow 

\ ^ .^r^ To see them a-m owing ; 

I am going to see them make 

hay. 

Little girl, little girl, 

What are you doing ? 

I will help you, if I may. 

I am packing my hand-bag 

And packing my trunk, 

I am going to the country to-day. 

102 




Little girl, little girl, 

Where are you going? 

I will go with you, if I may. 

I am going to the country 

To see them a-mowing; 

I am off to the country away. 



Little boy, little boy, 
What are you doing? 
I will work with you, if I may. 
I am making a bird-house 
To help the bluebirds; 
I am making a bird-house 
to-day. 






103 



THE HOGSHEAD 

It was summer and it was very warm. 
It is always very warm in the summer 

time. 
Sometimes in the warm weather, 

there is not much rain. 
When there is not much rain 

in the summer time, 

everything becomes very dry. 
One day Jack, the farmer, said to Fanny, 

his wife, " It is very warm." 
"Yes," said Fanny, the farmer's wife, 

"It is very warm." 
" We haven't had much rain all summer," 

said the farmer. 

104 



"No," said Fanny, the farmer's wife, 
"we haven't had much rain 
and everything is very dry." 

Then Jack, the farmer, said to his wife, 
"Tell Tom, the hired man, 
that he must put an iron hoop 
around the hogshead, 
or it will fall all to pieces." 




The farmer went off into the fields 

to work. 
"Tom," said Fanny, the farmer's wife, 

"Jack says you had better 

put an iron hoop 

around the hogshead. 
If you don't, it is so dry 

it will fall all to pieces." 
" Very well," said Tom, the hired man, 

" I will put an iron hoop 

around the hogshead." 
Then Tom went to the barn 

to get Jerry, the horse. 
It is very warm, Jerry," said Tom 

to the horse. "We haven't had 

much rain and it is very dry. 

106 



.. 



Jack says that I must put 

an iron hoop around the hogshead 

or it will fall all to pieces." 
Tom let Jerry, the horse, 

out to pasture. 
Jerry found Kicker, the mule, 

down in the meadow 

eating sweet grass. 
"Good day, Kicker," said Jerry, 

the horse. 
" Good day, Jerry," said Kicker, 

the mule. " It is very warm." 
"Yes," said Jerry, "it is very warm 

and everything is very dry. 
The farmer told Tom, 

the hired man, to put 

107 



m 

an iron hoop around the hogshead. 
If he doesn't, it is so dry 

it will fall all to pieces." 
Kicker, the mule, went on 

eating sweet grass. 
Soon he saw Brayer, the donkey, 

looking over the barnyard fence. 
" Good day, Brayer," said Kicker, 

the mule. 
"Good day, Kicker," said Brayer, 

the donkey. " It is very warm." 
" Yes," said Kicker, " it is very warm, 

and everything is very dry. 
The farmer told Tom, 

the hired man, to put 

an iron hoop around the hogshead. 

108 




If he doesn't, it is so dry 
it will fall all to pieces." 

u Poor Hoggy-woggy ! " cried Brayer, 
the donkey. And he ran off 
to tell Billy-goat out in the field. 

"Good day, Billy-goat," said Brayer, 
the donkey. 



U T+? 



It's a warm day," said Billy-goat. 

109 



u 



Yes/' said Brayer, the donkey. 

"It is very warm and very dry. 
The farmer told Tom 

to put an iron hoop 

around Hoggy-woggy's head 

to keep it from falling to pieces." 
"Poor Hoggy- woggy ! " cried Billy-goat, 

and he ran off to tell Nanny-goat. 
Billy-goat found Nanny-goat 

back of the barn 

eating anything she could find. 
" Good day, Nanny-goat/' said Billy-goat. 
" Good day, Billy-goat," said Nanny-goat. 

" It is very warm." 

"Yes, it is very warm 

and very dry," said Billy-goat. 

no 



u 



"The farmer told Tom 
to put an iron hoop 
around Hoggy-woggy's head 
to keep it from falling to pieces. 

" Poor Hoggy-woggy ! " 
cried Nanny-goat, 
and she ran to tell Dolly-cow. 

Nanny-goat found Dolly-cow 
lying on the ground 
in the shade of an oak tree 
and chewing her cud. 

i 

" Good day, Dolly-cow/' said Nanny-goat. 
" Good day, Nanny-goat," said Dolly-cow. 

"It is very warm." 
"Yes," said Nanny-goat, "it is very warm 

and everything is very dry. 

111 



The farmer told Tom, the hired man, 

to put an iron hoop 

around Hoggy-woggy's head. 
If he doesn't, it is so dry 

it will fall all to pieces." 
" Poor Hoggy-woggy ! " cried Dolly-cow, 

and she got up to go 

to tell Willy-calf. 
Dolly-cow found Willy-calf in the stall. 
" Good day, Willy-calf," said Dolly-cow. 
" Good day, Dolly-cow," said Willy-calf. 

" It is very warm." 
"Yes," said Dolly-cow, "it is very warm 

and everything is very dry. 

The farmer told Tom 

to put an iron hoop 

112 



around Hoggy-woggy's head. 
If he doesn't, it is so dry 

it will fall all to pieces." 
"Poor Hoggy-woggy ! " cried Willy-calf, 

and he ran to tell him 

how sorry he was that Tom 

must put an iron hoop 

around his head to keep it 

from falling to pieces. 
Willy-calf found Hoggy-woggy 

in the barnyard. 
"Oh, Hoggy-woggy!" cried Willy-calf. 

"Have you heard that the farmer 

told Tom, the hired man, 

to put an iron hoop 

around your head? 

113 




ME! ME!" HOGGY-WOGGY SQUEALED 



114 



If he doesn't, it is so dry 

your head will fall all to pieces." 

" Me ! Me ! " Hoggy-woggy squealed. 

Then he grunted and squealed, 
and he squealed and grunted. 

Willy-calf ran back to tell Dolly-cow 
how bad Hoggy-woggy felt 
because the farmer was going 
to have an iron hoop 
put around his head. 

Poor Hoggy-woggy squealed 

so loudly that Gander-lander 
came running into the barnyard 
to see what was the matter. 

"What is the matter with you?" 






cried Gander-lander. 

115 



" Me ! Me ! " squealed Hoggy-woggy. 
" The farmer told Tom, the hired man, 
to put an iron hoop around 
my head. He said if he didn't 
my head would fall all to pieces." 

Hoggy-woggy grunted and squealed 
and squealed and grunted, 
and Gander-lander ran off to tell 
Goose-loose the story. 

Gander-lander found Goose-loose 
down by the pond. 

u Oh, Goose-loose ! have you heard 
the news about Hoggy-woggy?" 
cried Gander-lander. 

"What news?" asked Goose-loose. 

" Why, this," said Gander-lander. 

116 



"The farmer told Tom 

to put an iron hoop 

around Hoggy-woggy's head. 
If he doesn't, it is so dry 

it will fall all to pieces." 
" Poor Hoggy-woggy," said Goose-loose 

to Gander-lander. 

"Have you told Drake-lake?" 




"ISTo," said Gander-lander. "Let us 
find Drake-lake and tell him." 

So Gander-lander and Goose-loose 
went to tell Drake-lake. 

He was out in the pond. 

" Oh, Drake-lake/' cried Goose-loose, 
"have you heard the news 
about poor Hoggy-woggy ? " 

" What news ? What is the matter 
with Hoggy-woggy ? " 

"Why," said Goose-loose, 
"the farmer told Tom 
to put two iron hoops 
around Hoggy-woggy's head 
to keep it from falling to pieces. 



)) 



" Poor Hoggy-woggy," said Drake-lake. 

118 






" Have you told Duck-luck ? " 
"No," said Goose-loose. "Let us find 

Duck-luck and tell him." 
So Gander-lander, Goose-loose, 

and Drake-lake found Duck-luck. 
" Oh, Duck-luck," cried Drake-lake, 

"have you heard the news 

about poor Hoggy-woggy ? " 
" What news ? What is the matter 

with Hoggy-woggy?" 

asked Duck-luck. 
"Why," said Drake-lake, 

"the farmer told Tom 

to put three iron hoops 

around Hoggy-woggy' s head 

to keep it from falling to pieces." 

119 



u 



Poor Hoggy-woggy," said Duck-luck. 

" Have you told Cock-lock ? " 
"No," said Drake-lake. a Let us find 

Cock-lock and tell him the news." 
So Gander-lander, Goose-loose, 

Drake-lake, and Duck-luck 

ran to tell Cock-lock. 
" Oh, Cock-lock," cried Duck-luck, 

"have you heard the news 

about poor • Hoggy-woggy ? " 
" What news ? What is the matter 

with Hoggy-woggy?" 
"Why," said Duck-luck, 

"the farmer told Tom 

to put four iron hoops 

around Hoggy-woggy's head 

120 



to keep it from falling to pieces." 
"Poor Hoggy-woggy," said Cock-lock. 

" Have you told Hen-pen ? " 
"No," said Duck-luck. "Let us go 

and tell Hen-pen." 
So Gander-lander, Goose-loose, 

Drake-lake, Duck-luck, 

and Cock-lock ran to tell Hen-pen 

the news. 
" Oh, Hen-pen," cried Cock-lock, 

"have you heard the news 

about poor Hoggy-woggy ? " 
" What news ? What is the matter 

with Hoggy-woggy?" 

"Why," said Cock-lock, 

"the farmer told Tom 

121 



,. 



to put iron hoops 

all around Hoggy-woggy's head 

to keep it from falling to pieces." 
Poor Hoggy-woggy," said Hen-pen. 

" Have you told Chicken-licken ? " 
No," said Cock-lock. a Let us go 

and tell Chicken-licken." 
So Gander-lander, Goose-loose, 

Drake-lake, Duck-luck, Cock-lock, 

and Hen-pen all ran 

to tell Chicken-licken the news. 
" Oh, Chicken-licken," cried Hen-pen, 

"have you heard the news 

about poor Hoggy-woggy ? " 
" What news ? " asked Chicken-licken. 

"What is the matter?" 

122 



"Why," said Hen-pen, 
I u the farmer told Tom 

to put iron hoops 
I around Hoggy-woggy. 

If he doesn't, 
|| it is so dry 

he will fall to pieces." 
"Poor Hoggy-woggy," 

said Chicken-licken. 
"Let us find 

poor Hoggy-woggy 

and tell him 

how sorry we are 

that he must have 
I iron hoops put 

all around him." 

123 



So Gander-lander, Goose-loose, 

Drake-lake, Duck-luck, Cock-lock, 

Hen-pen, and Chicken-licken 

all ran to find poor Hoggy-woggy. 

But Hoggy-woggy could not be found. 

" Where can Hoggy-woggy be ? " 
asked Chicken-licken. 

"Torn must have taken him 

to put the iron hoops around him," 
said Hen-pen. 

" Poor, poor Hoggy-woggy ! " 
they all cried. 

Then Chicken-licken said, 

"Let us run and find Willy-calf 
and tell him that Hoggy-woggy 
is gone. 

124 



Tom must have taken him to put 
the iron hoops around him." 

So Gander-lander, Groose-loose, 

Drake-lake, Duck-luck, Cock-lock, 
Hen-pen, and Chicken-licken 
all ran and told Willy-calf 
that Hoggy-woggy was gone 
and that Tom must have taken him 
to put the iron hoops around him. 

Then Willy-calf ran with them 
to tell Dolly-cow. 

She ran on with them, and they told 
Nanny-goat, Billy-goat, Brayer, 
the donkey, and Kicker, the mule. 

When Kicker, the mule, heard the news, 
he asked, "Who said that Tom 

125 



was going to put iron hoops 

around Hoggy-woggy ? " 
"You said the farmer told Tom, 

the hired man, to put an iron hoop 

around Hoggy-woggy's head/' 

said Brayer, the donkey. 
" Oh, Brayer, what a donkey you are ! " 



said Kicker, the mule. 

"I said that Tom, the hired man, 
must put an iron hoop around 
the hogshead back of the house, 
or it would fall all to pieces." 

Then Brayer turned around 
and looked at them all. 

He called out, " Isn't that 

what I told all the rest of you ? " 

126 




"No," they shouted, 

and they all began to laugh. 
Chicken-licken got to peeping 

and squeaking. 
Hen-pen began to cackle and cluck. 
Cock-lock began to crow. 
Duck-luck tried to laugh, 

but she could only quack. 

127 



Drake-lake threw his head back 
and quacked and quacked. 

Goose-loose nearly tumbled over, 
she laughed so much. 

Gander-lander could be heard laughing 
half a mile away. 

Willy-calf tried to moo like Dolly-cow. 

Nanny-goat and Billy-goat grabbed 
a tablecloth off the clothesline 
near the kitchen door 
and began to pull it to pieces 
and to stuff it into their mouths. 

Kicker, the mule, laughed loudest of all. 

Poor Brayer, the donkey, 

looked foolish standing there 
with the others laughing at him. 

128 



Jerry, the horse, heard the noise 
and came galloping up 
from the pasture. 

" Oh, Jerry," cried Kicker, the mule, 
"Brayer, the donkey, has told 
every one that Tom, the hired man, 
was going to put an iron hoop 
around Hoggy-woggy' s head, 
to keep it from falling to pieces ! " 

a Oh, Brayer," said Jerry, 

"you are as foolish as ever." 

Then Jerry neighed and neighed. 

"But where is Hoggy-woggy ? " 
he asked at last. 

JNTow all this time, Hoggy-woggy 

had been hiding under the barn. 

129 



He had heard all 

that the other animals had said, 
and had heard them all laughing. 

So when Jerry asked where he was, 
Hoggy-woggy came out 
from under the barn, 
blinking his little eyes 
and squealing and grunting. 

" Isn't it true," said Hoggy-woggy, 
"that the farmer is going to have 
an iron hoop put around my head?" 

" Why, no, of course not," 
said Jerry, the horse. 

" The farmer did not tell Tom 

to put an iron hoop 

around your head, Hoggy-woggy. 

130 



The farmer told Tom to put 

a hoop around the hogshead, 
that big wooden barrel 
at the back of the house." 

u Huh, huh ! " laughed Hoggy-woggy, 
"huh, huh." 

And all the animals went up 
back of the house to look 
at the new iron hoop which Tom 
had put around the hogshead 
to keep it from falling to pieces. 




Ul". , 



131 




THE SELFISH LITTLE WOMAN 

There is a land far away to the north 

of us. 
This land, so far away to the north 

of us, is called the Northland. 
In this far-away land 

called the Northland, 

the winter days are very short. 
But the winter nights in that 

far-away land are not short. 

132 



The winter nights in the Northland 

are very, very long. 
They are so long that no one 

can sleep all night. 
We do not have such long nights. 
And we do not have so much snow 

as in the Northland. 
When it snows in our country, 

the horses pull the sleighs 

over the snow. 
There are not many horses 

in the Northland. 
But there are a great many reindeer. 
There are no sleighs in the Northland. 
But there are many sledges. 
These sledges look like our sleighs. 

133 







Now when it snows in our country, 

the horses pull the sleighs 

over the snow. 
But when it snows in the Northland, 

the reindeer pull the sledges 

over the snow. 
The reindeer run very fast. 
The reindeer pull the sledges 

over the snow very quickly. 
There are also many little children 

in the Northland. 

134 



But in the Northland, little children 

do not look like the children 

in our country. 
In the Northland, the boys and girls 

wear funny, furry clothes. 
So the boys and girls 

there in the Northland 

look like little bears. 




These boys and girls, who wear 
such funny , furry clothes 
and look so much like little bears, 
are told a very queer story. 

The boys and girls like to hear 
this story. 

Once there was a very good man. 

This very good man was named Peter. 

Good Peter went everywhere 
trying to help others. 

One day when he was going about 
helping others, he came 
to the door of a little house. 

He had traveled a long way 
when he came to the door 
of the little house. 

136 



It was at the end of the day. 

He had eaten almost nothing. 

He had traveled so far 

that he was very tired, 
as well as very hungry. 

Now when the good man Peter 
reached the little house, 
he found a little woman 
making cakes. 




137 



As Peter was so hungry, he asked 

the little woman to give him 

just one of her cakes. 
Now the little woman was baking 

a great many cakes. 
But the little woman did not know 

that it was the good man Peter 

who asked her for one of her cakes. 
So she did not give him one 

of the big cakes she was baking. 
But she made another one — 

a very little cake. 
The little woman thought the big cakes 

were too big to give away. 
So she made a very little cake 

and put it into the oven to bake. 

138 



While it was baking, the little woman 
looked at it and she thought 
it was too big to give away. 

So she made another smaller cake. 

While it was baking, the little woman 
looked at it and she thought 
it was too big to give away. 

So she made a still smaller cake. 

She made it very, very little. 

While it was baking, the little woman 
looked at it and she thought 
it was too big to give away. 

Then the little woman took 

a very little speck of dough. 

She took this little speck of dough 
and rolled it and rolled it. 

139 



She rolled the little speck of dough 

until it was flat and thin. 
Then she put it into the oven to bake. 
The little cake was very small and thin. 
But while it was baking, 

the little woman looked at it. 
She thought she could not give 

the little cake away. 
She thought it was too big to give away. 
She said to herself, "My cakes seem 

too small when I eat them myself. 
But my cakes that seem too small 

when I eat them myself, 

are too big to give away." 
And the little woman would not give 

Peter any one of her little cakes. 

140 




141 



She would not give away even the last 
little cake she had made. 

She put all the little cakes away 
on the shelf in the cupboard. 

And the good man Peter 

did not have anything to eat. 

When he saw what the little woman 
had done, he was very angry. 

He said to her, 

" You think too much of yourself. 

You are too selfish to live 
as men and women do. 

I shall let you live, but you shall 
live as the birds do. You shall 
get only a little speck of food 
at a time, and you shall get it 

142 



by pecking and pecking and pecking 
all day in the hard, dry wood." 

Now after Peter had told 

the little woman she must live 
as the birds do, he drove her 
right up through the chimney. 

She went up the chimney 
without speaking a word. 

When she came out at the top 

of the chimney , the little woman 
was a little woodpecker. 

She had been changed into a bird. 

Before the little woman 

went up the chimney, she wore 
a red cap and a white dress. 

The red cap was still on her head. 

143 



But when she went up the chimney, 
her dress was blackened with soot. 

Her cap was red and her dress black. 

In the trees out in the woods, 
you may see the little bird 
who was once a little woman. 

This poor little bird, the woodpecker, 
lives in the trees till this very day. 

She is pecking and pecking and pecking 
all day in the hard, dry wood. 

But she gets only a little speck of food 
at a time. 



When you see the red cap 

and black dress of the woodpecker, 
remember to be kind and good. 

144 



Don't think that even the 
littlest you have is too 
large to give away. 

" You may not be changed 
to a bird, though you 
live 
As selfishly as you can ; 

But you will be changed 
to a smaller thing — 
A mean and selfish 
man." 




<SMmMmm 



145 




THE WOUNDED COOK 

A cock was scratching in the grass 

out in the meadow 

and a field mouse bit his leg. 
The cock ran to the house to find 

the good woman, the farmer's wife. 
He found her standing 

in the kitchen door. 
"See, good woman/' cried the cock, 

" see where the mouse bit me ! 

146 



Will you please give me a rag 
to bind up my wound?" 

I; 

"Bring me first two hairs 

il 

from the dog's tail," 

said the good woman. 
"Then I will give you a rag 

to bind up your wound." 
The cock did not know 

why the good woman wanted 

two hairs from the dog's tail. 
But he ran to find the dog. 
The dog was out in the driveway 

in front of the barn. 
He was watching the cat up in the tree, 
"See," cried the cock, "see where 

the mouse bit me ! " 

147 




Jr But the dog 

was watching the cat 
and did not hear. 
So the cock crowed 

" Cock-a-doodle-doo ! " 
Then the dog jumped up. 
'See where the mouse 

bit me ! " cried the cock. 



" Please give me two hairs 
from your tail 

to take to the good 






woman. 



M 



• \\^\U)^,^)/)y 



"What will the good 
Iffa woman give you ? " 
'S^i'fei^/n asked the dog. 



148 



"Then she will give me a rag 

to bind up my wound/ 5 

said the cock. 
" Get me first a loaf of bread 

from the baker," said the dog. 

"Get me a good loaf of bread. 

Then I will give you two hairs 

from my tail." 
So the cock ran to find the baker. 
The baker was in the kitchen 

baking bread. 
" Look," cried the cock, " see where 

the mouse bit me ! " 
But the baker was putting 

a loaf of bread into the oven. 

He did not see the cock. ' 

149 




So the cock crowed as loudly 

as he could, " Cock-a-doodle-do ! w 

Then the baker looked at the cock. 

"See where the mouse bit me!" 

the cock said. " Please give me 
a loaf of bread for the dog." 

"What will the dog give you?" 
asked the baker. 

150 



"Then the dog will give me 

two hairs from his tail 

for the good woman." 
"And what will the good woman 

give you?" asked the baker. 
"She will give me a rag to bind up 

my wound," said the cock. 
" First get me some wood for my fire," 

said the baker, "and then 

I will give you a loaf of bread 

for the dog." 
So the cock ran to the forest 

away down at the end 

of the meadow. 
" See ! " cried the cock. 

" See where the mouse bit me ! " 

151 




But the forest 

was so big 

that it did not see 

the little cock. 
So the cock crowed 

as loudly as he could, 

" Cock-a-doodle-doo ! " 
Then the forest 

saw the little cock. 
" See where the mouse 

bit me ! " 

cried the cock. 







152 



"Please give me some wood 

for the baker's fire 

in the kitchen." 
"What will the baker give you?" 

asked the forest. 
" Then he will give me a loaf of bread 

for the dog." 
" What will the dog give you ? " 

asked the forest. 
"The dog will give me two hairs 

from his tail for the good woman/' 

answered the cock. 
"And what will the good woman 

give you?" asked the forest. 
"The good woman will give me a rag 

to bind up my wound," said the cock. 

153 



" First get me some water/ 7 
said the forest, "and then 
I will give you some wood 
for the baker's fire." 

So the cock ran to find the spring. 

It was back of the forest, 

among the rocks on the side 
of a hill. 

"Look," cried the cock, "see where 
the mouse bit me ! " 




154 



The spring was running away 

toward the meadow 

and did not hear the cock. 
So the cock crowed as loudly 

as he could, " Cock-a-doodle-do ! " 
And the spring stopped 

and looked at the cock. 
u Please give me some water 

for the forest/' said the cock. 
u What will the forest give you ? " 

asked the spring. 
"Then the forest will give me 

some wood for the baker's fire 

in the kitchen/ 7 said the cock. 
"What will the baker give you?" 

asked the spring. 

155 



"The baker will give me 

a loaf of bread for the dog," 

said the cock. 
"What will the dog give you?" 

asked the spring. 
"The dog will give me 

two hairs from his tail 

for the good woman/' 

the cock answered. 
"And what will the good woman 

at the farmhouse give you ? " 

asked the spring. 
"The good woman 

will give me a rag 

to bind up my wound," 

said the cock. 

156 



And the spring bubbled up and ran 

over and down the hillside 

into the forest. 
It told the forest what the cock 

had said. 
Then the forest sent some wood 

to the baker for his fire 

in the kitchen. 
The baker gave the wounded cock 

a loaf of bread to take 

to the dog. 
The cock took the loaf of bread 

to the dog. 
Then the dog gave him 

two hairs from his tail 

for the good woman. 

157 



The cock took the two hairs 

to the good woman 

at the farmhouse, 

and the good woman 

gave the cock a rag 

to bind up his wound. 
The cock took the rag 

to Little Red Hen. 
Little Red Hen bound up his wound 

and the cock went on scratching. 




158 



VOCABULARY 



Pages 5-11 

named 
remember 

Page 12 

Joe 

butter 

sale 

only 

stutter 

trip 

sick 

Page 13 

cave 

woods 

hoods 

wonder 

frown 

Page 14 
Lem 
Lee 
Monday 

Page 15 

Sprat 
wife 
lean 
sparrow 

% 

die 

carried 

grave 

thrush 

dove 

mourned 

bull 

Hubbard 

cupboard 

Cantry 

pantry 



Page 16 

Cable 

stable 

Ricenest 

Muffet 

tuffet 

Cassock 

hassock 

Cammock 

hammock 

Pages 17-18 

Simon 

Tucker 

Sleepy 

Slow 

wait 

Greedy 

Nan 

pig 

child 

each 

wise 

bowl 

wool 

fiddle 

Pages 19-21 

bone 

horse 

grain 

bin 

dead 

meat 

curds 

whey 

spider 

frightened 

collie 

sniffed 

dolly 



"Most Beau- 
tiful Ani- 
mal" 

animals 

once 

most 

beautiful 

elephant 

camel 

tiger 

rabbit 

sure 

agree 

decide 

cunning 

owl 

wisdom 

hah 

dark 

eyes 

mane 

stripes 

glossy 

trunk 

humps 

neck 

ears 

rough 

brayed 

mooed 

except 

satisfied 

fairly 

" Simple 
Simon" 

taste 

ware 

penny 

indeed 

faH 

159 



because 

salt 

shoot 

wild 

hit 

hunting 

hare 

fishing 

whale 

thistle 

pricked 

finger 

till 

bled 

whistle 

sieve 

dry 

bids 

" Sour Grapes 
Again " 

those 
sweet 
yes 

" Finger 

Plays" 
kiss 
littlest 
almost 

"Cock Robin" 

bow 

arrow 

about 

bush 

chief 

love 

toll 

farewell 

sighing 



sobbing 
wicked 

"The Man 
Who Knew 
Every- 
thing" 

country 

knew 

great 

called 

own 

told 

send 

questions 

abbot 

answer 

earth 

ball 

surprised 

flat 

million 

God 

image 

"Jack Sprat 

and His 

Wife" 
platter 
always 
stew 
dining 
room 
pine 
licked 
knife 
such 
learn 
use 
sad 
story 



"Kindness 
and Praise" 

kindness 

praise 

ate 

everybody 

strength 

whitewashing 

fence 

playmates 

watch 

try 

better 

deal 

hot 

Pages 62-64 

between 

cleaned 

Nutch 

speak 

Low 

Dutch 

Malay 

talk 

themselves 

tall 

apples 

sold 

pair 

"Helping the 
Goodman" 

nearly 
cart 
voice 
enough 
Drake-lake 
pond 
needs 
Gander- 
lander 
grass 
edge 

Hoggy-woggy 
yup 



grunted 

Willy-calf 

stall 

chewing 

cud 

Nanny 

Billy 

field 

colt 

stop 

Brayer 

Kicker 

mule 

hurry 

unless 

Jerry 

upper 

end 

pasture 

hired 

peas 

garden 

Fanny 

kitchen 

trouble 

starting 

Pages 82-85 

leg 

says 

pan 

cut 

marry 

pit 

rise 

Gotham 

young 

lambs 

money 

cry 

Pages 87-90 

clothes 
sisters 
rich 
unhappy 



sickly 

why 

pudding 

daddy 

Spain 

"The Pit- 
fall" 
Graylegs 
trap 
dug 
hole 
pole 
middle 
above 
board 
covered 
branches 
tired 
bow-wow 
Mr. 
heels 
crawled 
picked 
frozen 
howled 
breakfast 
slowly 
rose 
meal 
thief 
turn 
stooped 
bag 

shoulder 
dragged 
stunned 
fourth 
second 
third 
peer 
twists 
scold 
friends 
fighting 
lose 

160 



Pages 102- 

103 
mowing 
packing 



"The Hogs- 
head" 
iron 
hoop 
doesn't 
lying 
shade 
oak 
sorry 
squealed 
loudly 
taken 
rest 

shouted 
squeaking 
cackle 
cluck 
quack 
grabbed 
clothesline 
door 
stuff 
foolish 
galloping 
neighed 
now 

blinking 
true 
course 
wooden 
barrel 
huh 

"The Selfish 
Little 
Woman" 

selfish 

short 

sleighs 

reindeer 

sledges 



quickly 

also 

wear 

funny 

furry 

these 

Peter 

traveled 

cakes 

give 

baking 

oven 

smaller 

speck 

dough 

until 

seem 

angry 

food 

pecking 

chimney 

word 

changed 

dress 

blackened 

soot 

though 

mean 

"The 
Wounded 
Oock" 

bit 

rag 
bind 
wound 
driveway 
front 
cock-a- 
doodle-doo 
loaf 
forest 
among 
toward 
bubbled